04 August 2008

So I smoked the apple ribs yesterday, they came out pretty well!

First on Saturday, I prepped the spice mix, using cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves. Reserved a bit less than 1 tablespoon of it, for use with the glaze. I found a jar that had just a bit of apple sauce left in it, and used that (maybe 1/4 or 1/3 cup) to mix up the spices, with an unmeasured handful of brown sugar for sweetness. I stirred it up into a thick brown spice paste. The allspice and the paste consistency reminded me of jerk seasoning:



Then after removing the membrane, rinsing, and drying the ribs, I rubbed the paste on. I wrapped it tightly in plastic wrap and stuck it back in the fridge.



Here it is on the Weber/Smokenator, using hickory for smoke. Forgot to get apple wood at the store, but I wouldn't probably notice the difference anyway. I also had a tin of beans mixed with some leftover brisket burnt ends, diced up.



After three and a half hours I pulled it off and wrapped it in heavy foil. As you can see they are getting pretty close to done, even at this stage. Simply because I didn't want to keep feeding charcoal to my Weber in the blazing heat, I cheated and set the oven at 250 degrees. Does the job! I also poured on a few ounces of my fermented apple cider to steam it nicely.



After an hour and a half, I started cooking down the can of apple juice concentrate. I added in the remaining reserved spices, and got it cooking pretty good. Here it is about half way through, but I think I overdid it, and turned it essentially into caramel. When it was done it was a dark brown thick caramel sludge, with the apple flavor a bit muted by the caramelisation process. Still, caramel ribs are tasty...



So after it had steamed in foil for almost 2 hours, I pulled the ribs out, and they were, at least by Steven Raichlen's standards, a bit TOO done, and were definitely falling off the bone. I brushed on the thick apple glaze and stuck them back in the oven, really for only about 5-10 minutes or so. I took them out, cut them up, and drizzled the remaining apple glaze on top. Served with the smoked BBQ beans and a glass of the aforementioned cider. Reminded me of the sweet glazed pork ribs you sometimes get at chain restaurants, except the pork isn't bland, it is smoky and flavorful.



To change next time:
  1. Perhaps use a little more apple sauce, or perhaps apple butter, for a thicker coating of the spice marinade.
  2. Lessen the length of time in foil, so the ribs at least stay on the bone.
  3. Boil the glaze for less time, to decrease the caramel flavor and leave more apple flavor in.

6 comments:

The Unabashed Blogger said...

If you are having a problem eating them then maybe you should give me a call....

What does your wife get to eat? I've only ever seen her eat toast.

Ive heard some use apple liqueur in their bastings and sauces. That should be tasty.

The Irascible Neufonzola said...

Hey, my wife prefers toast! Last night I made her a grilled cheese. Not many would choose grilled cheese over smoked ribs, but she definitely would!

I have to indoctrinate the baby...BBQ good, BBQ good...

the wife said...

You owe me some applesauce.

The Angry Coder said...

Soon Master Elf, you will enjoy the fabled hospitality of the dwarves. Roaring fires, malt beer, red meat off the bone!

If only I were a master elf...

Percussivity said...

You must start out as an apprentice elf and work your way up. It takes perseverance and a few thousand years of training.

The Irascible Neufonzola said...

Now, was that a Tolkien line or a Peter Jackson line? If the former I will excuse it but if the latter, what exactly is "malt beer"? Beer is made from malt, so "malt beer" is as redundant as "NIC card". Granted, I still say "NIC card".

Next time you guys have a shindig advise me and I can send ye off with a selection of my fermented wares. All I should require is the returned bottles, thoroughly rinsed immediately after emptying.